Melilla is part of Spain, not Morocco!

by Kimberly on Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Tension may be rising between The Spanish and Moroccan government with a recent discovery by The Gazette Newspaper.

For those of you who may not know, Spain maintains a small territory in Northern Africa called Melilla, nothing more than a city that is Spanish land.

According to internal documents, it seems that Morocco has been issuing passports to its "citizens" born in Melilla, listing it as "Melilla, Morocco" and treating it as if it were part of the Moroccan kingdom.

The Spanish government is aware of the situation. In fact, the Secretary of State for Security Antonio Camacho reported by letter to the Secretary General of Consular Affairs of the existence of these illegal travel documents in mid-July. On the 30th of this month the Secretary of Foreign Affairs, María Jesús Figa Camacho, said that the government has taken the "appropriate steps" and that "as a result Moroccan authorities "will proceed to replace the words" Birthplace: Melilla, Morocco for Melilla exclusively.

This means that the Moroccan government is again questioning the sovereignty of the autonomomous Spanish city of Melilla. Officials say that despite these efforts by the Spanish government, Morocco continues issuing irregular documents. In addition, the authorities of the Alawite kingdom have not been committed to eliminating passports already in circulation.

Diplomatic relations between both countries are now "very delicate" and there is currently an online poll on La Gaceta newspaper website to ask people if King Juan Carlos should cancel his upcoming trip to Morocco.

This is not the first nor likely to be the last provocation by Morocco in connection with the sovereignty of Ceuta and Melilla, but it is one of the most serious, since it is the first time official documents have been issued by the Moroccan government.

But agents say the real slogan is another senior police and they asked for "flexibility" and are "volunteers" if they detect these documents because diplomatic relations between both countries are now "very delicate".

In Ceuta and Melilla border posts saved some of those passports, and officials say that despite these efforts the Government, Morocco continues issuing irregular documents. In addition, the authorities of the Alawite kingdom have not been committed to eliminating passports already in circulation.


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