The Burial of the Sardine and the end of Carnival!

by suzanne.pope on Wednesday, March 01, 2017

Gigantes and Cabezudos Parade

Today Carnival ends, but the crazy costumes are not packed away yet! There is one more celebration to mark the end of Carnival’s indulgences – El Entierro de la Sardina (Burial of the Sardines). If you are studying Spanish with us in Spain or just happen to be in one of our destinations tonight, we highly recommend you check out the festivities! Here are a few of the best celebrations and where to find them.

El Carnaval termina, pero las costumbres curiosas no terminan todavía. Queda una celebración para el fin del Carnaval, el entierro de la Sardina. Si estás estudiando en España o estás en alguno de nuestros destinos te recomendamos que te unas a la fiesta en…:

Madrid

Tonight at 6pm the famous Giants and Big-heads parade begins from San Antonio de la Florida, where the people walk along the river Manzanares and finally bury the tiny fish in its tiny coffin near the Fuente de los Parjaritos (Fountain of the Birds) at approximately 8:30pm. Aside from the fake-somber (it’s actually very fun) funeral procession, there is also a lively parade trailing behind, complete with gigantes and cabezudos (giants and big-heads).

A las 6 de la tarde los famosos gigantes y cabezudos se pasean desde San Antonio de la Florida hasta la Fuente de los Pajaritos llevando al pequeño pez en su pequeño ataúd. El cortejo comienza a las 8:30 PM. Este falso cortejo es seguido por un animado desfile.

Alicante

The funeral begins at 9pm at the Plaza Santa Teresa and ends at Plaza del Carmen, where the poor fish is burned and people dance in the plaza. If you want to see the procession, it passes by the following sites: Panteón de Quijano, Plaza España,Calderón de la Barca,Tomás López Torregrosa, Duque de Zaragoza, Plaza Ruperto Chapí, Calle del Teatro, Bazán, Gerona, Rambla Méndez Núñez, Miguel Soler, San Nicolás, Abad Nájera and finally, Plaza del Carmen.

El funeral comienza a las 9PM en la Plaza de Santa Teresa y termina en la Plaza del Carmen, donde el pobre pez es quedado mientras la gente baila alrededor de la hoguera. Si quieres ver este desfile, debes saber que pasa por: Panteón de Quijano, Plaza España,Calderón de la Barca,Tomás López Torregrosa, Duque de Zaragoza, Plaza Ruperto Chapí, Calle del Teatro, Bazán, Gerona, Rambla Méndez Núñez, Miguel Soler, San Nicolás, Abad Nájera y finalmente, por Plaza del Carmen.

Tenerife

Head to Calle Juan Pablo II in Santa Cruz at 9pm to watch the Burial of the Sardine. Join the hysteria as a loud trail of mourners, pregnant men and widows follow behind an oversized fake sardine on a thrown. It is quite a spectacle with all of the townspeople crying out for the sardine – or perhaps the end of Carnival.

Dirígete a la Calle Juan Pablo II en Santa Cruz a las 9PM para ver el entierro. Únete al frenesí de las dolientes, de hombres embarazados, y de viudas que siguen a una sardina sobredimensionada. Es un todo un espectáculo ver a todos los habitantes de la ciudad llorando a la Sardina.

Most towns in Spain have some version of this corky festival, so regardless of where you might be in Spain don’t miss out on the festivities, hilarious role-playing and public displays of hysteria! 

La mayoría de pueblos y ciudades españolas tienen versiones de este pintoresco festival, así que no te lo pierdas. ¡Únete a la fiesta, a la alegría, a la gente y disfruta de la locura!


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Comments

1 » Vadim (on Tuesday, May 16, 2017) said:

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